Saturday, March 14, 2020

Free Essays on East Of Eden

Love is the inspiring force behind all conflicts in the book East of Eden by John Steinbeck. Every character, in one way or another, is possessed by love, to do things that aren’t always well thought out. Cyrus, Charles, Adam, Cathy, Aron, and Cal Trask are all in a continual battle for each other’s love. In certain cases this battle ends in death or close to. Cyrus Trask established his love for his family by training his boys all their lives to prepare for war. To Cyrus, the army was the most respectable job that one could have. So he saw no conflict (even though it was an apparent one) in the fact that even though he loved his son, he was sending him off to his death. He picked the son he loved best, Adam, even though Charles Trask was clearly the natural soldier of the two brothers. In chapter 3 Steinbeck explains, "Charles was a natural athlete and the competitor’s will to win over others, which makes for success in the world†. (Steinbeck 20) â€Å"Young Charles won all contests with Adam whether they involved skill, strength, or intelligence and won them so easily that quite quickly that he had to find his competition among other children." (Steinbeck 20) When Cyrus decided that it was Adam who was to go to into the army it was made apparent that he loved Adam more than Charles. He would only give the distinct order to go and become a soldier to his most prized son. Charles loved his father more than Adam ever did. In fact, Adam claims to hate his father. Charles and Adam have a divided relationship when Adam gets back from the war. Charles wants nothing more than to know that his father loves him. He does everything he can, buys him nice presents, is very obedient, and takes care of the farm when both men leave. It is ironic that the one who wanted and needed love the most was the one who received it the least. This lack of love creates jealousy that comes out as violence from Charles. After Cyrus had chosen Adam, Cha... Free Essays on East Of Eden Free Essays on East Of Eden If I could recommend a work of fiction to read and be contemplated by my fellow classmates, it would be John Steinbeck’s East of Eden. East of Eden parallels Genesis times, with a traditional good versus evil story line. The profound depth of the novel leaves one with knowledge and insight for everyday life. East of Eden is the most stimulating novel I have ever read. It is set in the early twentieth century, a time of hardships and a specific struggle for identity. Steinbeck gives the readers Cathy, the incarnation of evil. He symbolically has Adam as the protagonist of the novel. Cathy fights against the traditional role of women and is determined to be in control, while Adam, the innocent bystander, has an almost fatal downfall caused by being too trusting. Caleb and Aron, Adam‘s sons, relive the story of Cain and Abel while learning the consequences of favoritism and preferred love. Everyone can connect to a character in East of Eden and the inner struggles the characters experience, while also relating to the bigger conflicts exhibited. Steinbeck seems to ask the question, â€Å"Is life a carousel revolving around predestined fate or can we choose our own destiny and not repeat the mistakes of history.† To read the novel means the reader is certain to judge the battles in their own life. East of Eden carries a hopeful message to all readers that the endurance of love and decisions from the heart will prevail over all obstacles.... Free Essays on East Of Eden In East of Eden, John Steinbeck explores man’s role in the battle of good versus evil. The story of the Trask family strongly mirrors the story of Cain and Abel in the Bible. Steinbeck questions throughout the novel whether or not the descendants of the Trask family, particularly Adam’s son Cal, can escape the pattern. Steinbeck expresses his opinion through Adam’s insightful Chinese servant, Lee. After much research, Lee tells Samuel Hamilton and Adam Trask: Don’t you see? The American Standard translation orders men to triumph over sin, and you call sin ignorance. The King James translation makes a promise in â€Å"Thou shalt,† meaning that men will surely triumph over sin. But the Hebrew word, the word timshel â€Å"Thou mayest† – that gives a choice. It might be the most important word in the world. That says the way is open. That throws it right back on a man. For if â€Å"Thou mayest† – it is also true that â€Å"Thou mayest not.† Don’t you see? In this passage, Steinbeck explores man’s role in the central theme of the novel, the battle between good and evil. Lee’s thoughts about the story of Cain and Abel contribute greatly to both the plot and the theme of the novel. His studies of the Hebrew word timshel provide hope to Adam’s son Cal that he will be able to break the chain of the Trask family. It also foreshadows Cal success in completing the task. As far as theme is concerned, Lee’s studies of the word timshel show that man can affect the battle between good and evil by his choice. Steinbeck discovered through the novel the importance of choice in every man. Lee’s exploration of the Hebrew word timshel shows that man can truly affect his life. The one flaw in East of Eden, as most critics agree, is Cathy. Steinbeck describes Cathy as being born evil, so she did not have a choice. However, this flaw makes East of Eden more realistic because perfection would make the story see... Free Essays on East Of Eden The central point that I’ve seen so far in East of Eden is that it dramatizes the continuous conflict between good and evil within individuals and in society as a whole. The most important contrast explored in this first section, however, is that between the large, loving Hamilton family and the small, tension-ridden Trask family. The difference between these two families represents the differing moral environments in which their children later develop. In this essay, I will try to explain how Steinbeck explores the clash between good and evil through a number of contrasts; his introduction, and the main focus who are Adam and Charles. Steinbeck begins the novel with a detailed description of the natural landscape and beauty of the Salinas Valley where he grew up, establishing an important early symbol for the conflict between good and evil: the contrast between the dark, threatening Santa Lucia Mountains to the west and the bright, welcoming Gablian Mountains to the east. The narrator, whose voice is really that of Steinbeck, says that he learned to tell east from west by looking at these mountains, symbolizing the human dilemma of having to find the way between light and darkness, goodness and evil. The narrator then tells about his grandparents, Samuel and Liza Hamilton, who arrive in the valley from Ireland. They have to settle on the worst land, as the best is already taken. Samuel begins working as a blacksmith to support his nine children; he also works as a well digger and as an unlicensed doctor. Samuel Hamilton is a powerful symbol of good and his bond with his family is very strong. Cyrus Trask, on the other hand, is a menacing symbol of corruption and familial divisiveness. Within the Trask family, the focus of this section, the contrast between Charles and Adam is of significant importance. The plot is essentially a complicated retelling of the Biblical story of Cain and Abel. Adam is kind and good-natured, while C... Free Essays on East Of Eden Love is the inspiring force behind all conflicts in the book East of Eden by John Steinbeck. Every character, in one way or another, is possessed by love, to do things that aren’t always well thought out. Cyrus, Charles, Adam, Cathy, Aron, and Cal Trask are all in a continual battle for each other’s love. In certain cases this battle ends in death or close to. Cyrus Trask established his love for his family by training his boys all their lives to prepare for war. To Cyrus, the army was the most respectable job that one could have. So he saw no conflict (even though it was an apparent one) in the fact that even though he loved his son, he was sending him off to his death. He picked the son he loved best, Adam, even though Charles Trask was clearly the natural soldier of the two brothers. In chapter 3 Steinbeck explains, "Charles was a natural athlete and the competitor’s will to win over others, which makes for success in the world†. (Steinbeck 20) â€Å"Young Charles won all contests with Adam whether they involved skill, strength, or intelligence and won them so easily that quite quickly that he had to find his competition among other children." (Steinbeck 20) When Cyrus decided that it was Adam who was to go to into the army it was made apparent that he loved Adam more than Charles. He would only give the distinct order to go and become a soldier to his most prized son. Charles loved his father more than Adam ever did. In fact, Adam claims to hate his father. Charles and Adam have a divided relationship when Adam gets back from the war. Charles wants nothing more than to know that his father loves him. He does everything he can, buys him nice presents, is very obedient, and takes care of the farm when both men leave. It is ironic that the one who wanted and needed love the most was the one who received it the least. This lack of love creates jealousy that comes out as violence from Charles. After Cyrus had chosen Adam, Cha...

Thursday, February 27, 2020

Analyze compare and contrast two books Research Paper

Analyze compare and contrast two books - Research Paper Example John who is Ann’s mother and the Red Girl. Anne is the main character who dominates the whole novel and the story is told in her own subjective voice. The author depicts Anne as an arrogant and complex being who struggles to survive and define her own separate world from that of her mother. Anne is seen to develop as a character as she struggles with the fear of separation from her mother, becomes an expert in marbles and eventually develops hatred and anger as she rebels against her mother’s attempts to define her world (Kincaid 32). Mrs. John’s character is developed and defined by Ann through her subjective narration. She is initially portrayed as a person who is strong, wonderful, kind and full of knowledge about the societal norms and values. Anne develops bitterness and hatred towards Mrs. John when she repeatedly tells her that they are two separate beings. In addition to this, Anne points to her mother’s sexual relationship with her husband as the reasons for her alienation and neglect. The Red Girl on the other hand is developed as a character that represents the outside world and does not have to adhere to the societal norms and values. The Red Girl represents the new world which Anne dreams of creating and she becomes a key figure in Anne’s development as a character by offering her a sense of self. The major characters in The portrait of a young artist as a young man by James Joyce includes: Stephen Dedalus, Simon Dedalus, Emma Clery, Cranly and Charles Stewart Parnell. Stephen Dedalus, the main character in the novel, is developed as a highly sensitive individual. He has the advantage of a quality education but is portrayed to be living in isolation and deprivation amidst the oppressive colonial nationality, highly developed social immorality and extremist family and religious values. Just like Anne in Annie John by Jamaica Kincaid, Stephen feels trapped and seeks escape by abandoning the restrictive societal norm s and living freely as an artist. As a character, Stephen undergoes growth, development and transformation as the story progresses. His transformations occurs in various stages starting in his first year in college where he demonstrates that he is an intellectual person with his understanding of societal systems and begins to create a different perception of his environment (Joyce 32). Another transformation occurs when Stephen engages in sexual intercourse with the prostitute in Dublin which transforms his from innocence to promiscuity according to the societal values. The third transformation was motivated by Father Arnall’s speech regarding the concept of death and hell which led to his conversion from a sinner to a Catholic. His final transformation indicates his maturity as a conscious individual when he changes his obsession from religion and focuses on the appreciation of art and beauty. Thematic analysis Themes refer to the major topic or subject in a piece of literat ure. The themes in Annie John by Jamaica Kincaid include the relationships between mother and daughter, colonization and the impact of colonial education and the various gender relations in the society. The main theme is the relationship between mother and child where Kincaid develops the complex relationship between Anne and her mother in her childhood and adolescence. As a result of the closeness of their relationship, Anne encounters several challenges and tension as she

Tuesday, February 11, 2020

Interpersonal Styles Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words

Interpersonal Styles - Essay Example She had to wake up early in the morning to settle the personal activities. She had make food for the kids, ready them and leave them to school. After settling with the children, she had to arrange to join the work. As a railway accounts clerk, she has various sensitive responsibilities to maintain the accounts records proficiently and accurately. She has to keep extreme presence of mind and sharp thinking capability, which are essential to deliver competitive work performance. The proper maintenance and updating of accounting records are very much essential for building competitive advantage and for the profitable growth of the organization. Linda hobbies are to read various kinds of food making books. She also read those books because she is fond of cooking. In free time, she used to watch comedy and reality shows for reviving from stress and recreation. She had two Kids named Lina and Tom who are fond of watching cartoon shows, which inherits them with enjoyment and happiness in their life. Linda use to be formal in wear with gowns and sandals in professional place whereas at home and other social events she puts on casual appearance with jeans, t-shirts and boots. Kids have variation in dresses in relation to school and other places. In school, Tom used to be dressed with yellow T-shirts and white pants whereas Lina puts on frocks. Linda and her two kids Lina and Tom have shown varied differences in their interpersonal styles. Three of the individuals as human nature vary according to the psychological effects that arise in their life. Lina shows assertive interpersonal style when her mother does not call her to go to school. She used to enjoy and play with her friends the whole day. Her mother brings various toys to play and comedy books for reading for the children. Conversely, shows aggressive interpersonal styles when one of the above requirements are not fulfilled.

Friday, January 31, 2020

Everyday Life in the Industrial Revolution Essay Example for Free

Everyday Life in the Industrial Revolution Essay Industrialisation created an enormous impact on people’s everyday lives. Many machines were invented to produce goods much more quickly and efficiently. This lowers the price for expensive goods such as textiles and furniture and made it more affordable for everyone due to mass production. Steam trains were also invented to move perishable goods and people in quickly in long distances to markets and bring fresh, organic foods to cities which are growing in population. Trains were an affordable form of transport for citizens and people. The invention of steam ships allowed a large number of people to North America and Australia from Europe. These were the fundamental changes that occurred during the industrial revolution. The first artificial was produced using gas. These lights made cities safer, it allowed people begin to go out at night to social events or meetings, shops and factories open for longer. Working hours in in factories were also extended thanks to the invention of artificial lighting. Electricity led to the development of household appliances such as refrigerators and irons that help with house chores. It also led to many innovations such as telegraph which made communication much easier, following the telegraph were the telephone and radio. Technologies has made a dramatic change to people’s ordinary lives, it has affected the society in a positive and negative way. The industrialised innovations helped with factory work and produce products more efficiently; however these machineries have highly polluted the environment. It was very surprising how far society have come, the development of technologies made the process of things much easier. Thanks to these inventions made during the industrial revolution and is still being improved, changed the lives of younger generations. Children in the modern society now have phones, iPad, iPod etc.

Thursday, January 23, 2020

A Comparison of Romantic Love in Shakespeares Sonnets & As You Like It

Shakespeare's Sonnets & Romantic Love in As You Like It      Ã‚  Ã‚   Shakespeare's comedy As You Like It is clearly a pastoral comedy with a country setting, a theme revolving around love and a story which consists of a series of accidental meetings between characters and a resolution involving transformations of characters and divine intervention.   The comedy involves the traditional literary device of moving urban characters into the country where they have to deal with life in a different manner.   Whereas the pastoral comedy was usually a vehicle for satire on corrupted urban values, in this play the satire appears to be directed at the convention of Petrarchan love.(Rosenblum, 86)    Renaissance conventions of love were strongly influenced by the elaborate system of love called the Petrarchan tradition.   An Italian poet, Francesco Petrarch, wrote a cycle of sonnets to his beloved Laura, which became internationally popular.   In his poetry, Petrarch professes his undying love, and laments her cruelty for not returning his passionate devotion.   He also describes the inspiration for his love - a single glance from her eyes.   In the course of his sonnets, Petrarch and Laura never meet or speak.   She may not even know he exists.   Midway through the sonnet sequence Laura dies.   Petrarch continues to adore and mourn her in verse years after her death.   His lyric poetry, meant to be read and not performed, is the first form for the self in conflict.      English Renaissance poets admired and imitated Petrarch.   He centered his sonnets on a series of themes: Love, Chastity, Death, Fame, Time and Eternity.   Petrarch established the basic form of the Italian sonnet as fourteen lines divided into two clear parts, an opening o... ...rold.Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human.New York: Riverhead Books, 1998. Booth, Stephen, (ed).Shakespeare's Sonnets,New Haven: Yale University Press, 2000. Dolan, Frances E (ed).William Shakespeare: As You Like It, New York:   Penguin Books, 2000. Garber, Marjorie. "The Education of Orlando." In Comedies from Shakespeare to Sheridan, Newark: Univ of Delaware Press, 1986. Hodges, Devon.   "Anatomy as Comedy." In Renaissance Fictions of Anatomy, pp50-67.   Amherst:   Univ of Massachusetts Press, 1985. Mowat, Barbara A. and Paul Werstine (ed.s)   As You Like It by William Shakespeare, New York: Pocket Books, 1997. Moulton, Charles Wells,(ed)   The Library of Literary Criticism of English and American Authors Vol.1 (680-1638), New York: Peter Smith, 1935. Rosenblum, Joseph.  Ã‚   A Reader's Guide to Shakespeare,   Barnes & Noble Books, 1997.   

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Analysis of the Novel the Broken Boot

The     Broken     Boot by John   Galsworthy The English novelist and playwright John   Galsworthy   (1867-1933) was one of the most popular writers of the early 20th century. His work explores the transitions and contrasts between pre-and post-World War I England. As his popularity increased,   Galsworthy   published other novels of the Forsyte series: Indian Summer of a Forsyte (1918), In Chancery (1920), Awakening (1920), and To Let (1921). Although   Galsworthy   is best known for his novels, he was also a successful playwright.He constructed his drama on a legalistic basis, and the plays typically start from a social or ethical impulse and reach a resolution after different viewpoints have been expressed. This short story by the title   The     Broken     Boot  (1923) and by the author John   Galsworthy   begins with Gilbert Caister, an actor who had been â€Å"out† for six months, emerging from his lodging about noon. The opening of a play, on tour, in which he was playing a part in the last act rewarded him with four pounds a week.He stepped before a fishmonger's and regarded a lobster. The pleasure of looking at the lobster was not enough to detain him so he moved upstreet. Next he stopped before a tailor's window. He could see a reflection of himself in the faded brown suit gotten from a production the year before the war. The sunlight was very hard on seams and buttonholes. He walked on and became conscious of a face he knew—Bryce-Green. He says to come with him and have lunch. Bryce-Green was a wealthy patron in that South Coast convalescent camp.Caister answered that he'd be delighted. He asks Caister if he knows this place and proceeds to order cocktails. Caister thanks him for the lobster and says to himself that he's an amateur, but a nice man. They sat opposite one another at one of the two small tables. Bryce-Green says luck and Caister replies the same. Bryce-Green then asks Caister what he t hinks of the state of the drama. Caister replies awful. Green says yes there's nobody with any genius. Green then asks if he's been playing anything great. Caister says nothing particular.Green then says to have some more omelette. He then says that it must be a topping life, if you've talent like him. Green then says that he shall come and see him that night. Just six inches off the ground was Caister's boot which inspired the question of whether or not Caister was at all â€Å"rocky†. Caister's eyes met the object of the boot. The boot was split right across between lace and toecap. Caister replies to all of this, â€Å"not at all†. Green then states that he has an engagement that afternoon and pays the bill.

Monday, January 6, 2020

What Is the Chemical Formula of Sugar

The chemical formula of sugar depends on what type of sugar you are talking about and what type of formula you need.  Table sugar  is the common name for a sugar known as sucrose. It is a type of disaccharide made from the combination of the monosaccharides glucose and fructose. The chemical or molecular formula for sucrose is C12H22O11, which means each molecule of sugar contains 12 carbon atoms, 22 hydrogen atoms and 11 oxygen atoms. The type of sugar called sucrose is also known as saccharose. It is a saccharide that is made in many different plants. Most table sugar comes from sugar beets or sugarcane. The purification process involves bleaching and crystallization to produce a sweet, odorless powder. The English chemist William Miller coined the name sucrose in 1857 by combining the French word sucre, which means sugar, with the -ose chemical suffix that is used for all sugars. Formulas for Different Sugars However, there are many different sugars besides sucrose. Other sugars and their chemical formulas include: Arabinose -  C5H10O5 Fructose -  C6H12O6 Galactose -  C6H12O6 Glucose -  C6H12O6 Lactose -  C12H22O11 Inositol -  C6H12O6 Mannose -  C6H12O6 Ribose -  C5H10O5 Trehalose -  C12H22O11   Xylose -  C5H10O5 Many sugars share the same chemical formula, so it is not a good way to distinguish between them. The ring structure, location and type of chemical bonds, and three-dimensional structure are used to distinguish between sugars.